The Authors

Bo Leuf

has extensive experience in technical communication and teaching, coupled with a deep understanding of cross-platform software product design, user interfaces, and usability analysis. He maintains several professional and recreational Internet Web sites, including one that provides commercial Web hosting services for others. Several years of interest in collaboration and discussion tool solutions resulted in the creation of a “cluster” of customized WikiWiki servers for experimental, collaborative, and informative purposes.

An independent consultant in the computing sector in Sweden for some 25 years, Bo has been responsible for software development and localization projects. Training issues came to the foreground during a number of years as head of a language school specializing in an immersive teaching methodology. He is currently a freelance consultant and author, also a featured technical analyst for a Swedish computer magazine.

mailto:bo#@#wiki#.#org


Ward Cunningham

is the father of the WikiWiki concept and contributes his in-depth knowledge of “all things Wiki”. As the seminal hub of the Wiki experience, Ward provided invaluable contacts with developers experimenting with wiki clones. In addition, he contributed the original (licensed) source code on which the practical wiki examples in this book are based.

As Cunningham & Cunningham Inc., Ward and his wife, Karen, teach people to use objects — Ward is well known for his contributions to the developing practice of object-oriented programming, a variation called Extreme Programming, and the communities hosted by his WikiWikiWeb. He created the Class- Responsibility- Collaborator (CRC) design method, which helps teams find core objects for their programs. Ward has written for Pattern Languages of Programming (PLoP), the Journal of Object- Oriented Programming (JOOP), and the Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages, and Applications conference (OOPSLA) on these and other subjects.

mailto:ward#@#wiki#.#org

 

Last edited November 21, 2004
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